© Allan Colton North American beaver (Castor canadensis) off the North coast of British Columbia, Canada

Watershed Reports 2020

Many Canadian watersheds are in good health. But a lack of consistent monitoring may be hiding some of the more serious impacts of human activities.

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What We Do

World Wildlife Fund Canada is the country’s largest international conservation organization. Using the best scientific analysis and indigenous guidance, we work to conserve species at risk, protect threatened habitats, and address climate change. Our long-term vision is simple: to create a world where people and nature thrive.

Wildlife

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Wildlife

Our planet’s biodiversity is in crisis. Global wildlife populations have declined by 60 per cent on average over the past 40 years — and about half of Canada’s populations are also experiencing decline. WWF-Canada is working to reverse this.
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Habitat

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Habitat

In Canada, 84 per cent of habitats with high concentrations of at-risk species are inadequately or not at all protected. Alongside local and national partners, WWF-Canada is working to conserve ecologically important regions, create a network of protected areas and restore habitat across the country.
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Image of windmill in field.

Climate

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Climate

The climate crisis is wreaking havoc across the globe, putting the future of the planet as we know it at risk. WWF-Canada is working on nature-based climate solutions to reduce the release of greenhouse gas emissions into the atmosphere and increase our adaptation and resilience to the changes that have already begun.
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Innovation

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Innovation

WWF-Canada is using cutting-edge science and technology to help fill crucial data gaps, identify the most important habitats and use that knowledge to protect species diversity. From artificial intelligence to drones, conservation technologies are helping us find innovative solutions to some of the world’s most pressing environmental challenges.
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© Peter Ewins / WWF-Canada

What You Can Do

Young girl at computer

Connect with Nature Indoors

It's easy to feel disconnected from nature when you’re self-isolating at home. That’s why we’re finding new ways to bring the outdoors to you! Check out our list of ideas for things you can do from home.
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Lemur

Gifts That Change The World

The ring-tailed lemur is probably the most well-known of Madagascar’s 101 lemur species — and the best at relaxing. They can often be found sunbathing on the forest floor in a ‘yoga’ position. This holiday season, adopt a lemur or one of 40 species.
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beekeeper

Apply for a WWF School Grant

We are looking for projects that will help protect or restore nature, including activities related to creating, rehabilitating or recovering natural ecosystems and habitats in your school community.
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An American black bear (Ursus americanus) in the Great Bear Rainforest, British Columbia, Canada

Canada needs a green recovery plan

Canada has the chance to tackle biodiversity loss and climate change by growing a green and just economy — and nature can help us.
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© Victor Daggberg / WWF-Canada River with Trees

With Your Help

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healthy native plant gardens were planted through In the Zone Gardens

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kilograms of garbage were collected from Canadian shorelines through the Great Canadian Shoreline Cleanup

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square kilometres in the Last Ice Area (Tuvaijuittuq and Tallurutiup Imanga) were designated as protected areas
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